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Haley Calls Trump Insecure For Spreading False ‘Birther’ Claims

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Haley Calls Trump Insecure For Spreading False 'Birther' Claims

Nikki Haley, a Republican presidential candidate, has dubbed her adversary Donald Trump “insecure” after he circulated bogus assertions that she is ineligible to be President of the United States.

The former President promoted a “birther” conspiracy theory that questioned her eligibility since her parents were not born in the country.

Ms Haley was born in the United States; hence, she is eligible to run for office.

When asked about the attacks on CNN, Ms Haley responded: “I know President Trump well…”That is what he does when he feels threatened.”

She said, “That’s what he does when he feels insecure.”

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Haley Calls Trump Insecure For Spreading False ‘Birther’ Claims

For years, Donald Trump promoted a phoney conspiracy theory that President Barack Obama, who was born in Hawaii, falsified his birth certificate and was born in Kenya.

Ms Haley is Mr Trump’s closest competitor in the next Republican presidential nomination contest. New Hampshire voters will choose their candidate on Tuesday, and while Ms Haley has closed the distance, polling indicates the former President still has a significant lead.

Ms Haley’s popularity in the state has grown, and Mr Trump has increased his attacks on his former UN Ambassador, who was born in South Carolina to Indian immigrants. People born in the United States are eligible for office.

In addition to distributing a story suggesting Ms. Haley cannot run for President, Mr. Trump referred to her by her birth name, Nimarata, calling her “Nikki ‘Nimrada’ Haley” on his social media network, Truth Social. Ms. Haley’s middle name is Nikki.

When asked about the post and article by CNN’s Jake Tapper, Ms Haley stated she was a “proud daughter of Bamberg, South Carolina”.

“I adore my hometown and am glad to be from there. So, that’s the first question; we can disregard that,” she replied.

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“I am aware that I am a threat. “I understand why he’s doing that,”

“I am aware that I am a threat. “I understand why he’s doing that,” she added, adding that she would not engage in “name-calling” with him.

When Mr Trump initially published an article questioning Ms Haley’s fitness for office last week, Laurence Tribe, a constitutional expert at Harvard Law School, told NBC that the “birther” assertions were completely false.

“I can’t imagine what Trump hopes to gain by those claims unless it’s to play the race card against the former governor and UN ambassador as a woman of colour – and to draw on the wellsprings of anti-immigrant prejudice by reminding everyone that Haley’s parents weren’t citizens when she was born in the USA,” he said.

When Fox News anchor Brian Kilmeade questioned Ms Haley if the Republican Party was racist, she responded with a bigger point: “We’re not a racist country, Brian.” “We’ve never been a racist country,” she explained.

Some critics reacted negatively to her words

Ms Haley stated that she encountered racism growing up but that things had improved. “Are we perfect?” “No,” she added. “But our goal is to always make sure we try and be more perfect every day that we can.”

Some critics reacted negatively to her words, accusing her of forgetting America’s history of slavery and segregation, as well as current racism and prejudice.

A representative for Ms Haley defended the remarks, stating that there is a distinction between acknowledging the existence of racism and labelling the United States a “racist country”.

Despite coming third in last week’s Iowa caucuses behind Mr Trump and Florida Governor Ron DeSantis, Ms Haley has attempted to depict the fight for the Republican presidential nomination as a two-horse race between herself and the former President.

Experts believe she needs a strong performance in New Hampshire to prove she is a viable candidate as the campaign progresses.

SOURCE – (BBC)

Kiara Grace is a staff writer at VORNews, a reputable online publication. Her writing focuses on technology trends, particularly in the realm of consumer electronics and software. With a keen eye for detail and a knack for breaking down complex topics, Kiara delivers insightful analyses that resonate with tech enthusiasts and casual readers alike. Her articles strike a balance between in-depth coverage and accessibility, making them a go-to resource for anyone seeking to stay informed about the latest innovations shaping our digital world.

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Nearly 500 Confirmed Fatalities From Hajj Heatwave As Hundreds More Feared Dead

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The official death toll from this year’s Hajj pilgrimage has risen to around 500, but the true toll could be more than double that, with reports indicating that up to 600 Egyptian worshippers died on the way to Mecca in terrible heat.

At least 14 Malaysians, 165 Indonesians, 75 Jordanians, 35 Pakistanis, 49 Tunisians, 11 Iranians, and 98 Indians have died, according to officials in each nation. Another 27 Jordanians have been hospitalized, while about 14 are still missing, according to the Jordanian Foreign Ministry.

The US State Department stated that many US citizens perished on the Hajj trip but did not disclose a specific number. “We can confirm the deaths of several US Americans in Saudi Arabia. “We extend our heartfelt condolences to the families on their loss,” said a State Department official, adding that the government is ready to provide consular support.

Nearly 500 Confirmed Fatalities From Hajj Heatwave As Hundreds More Feared Dead

Dozens more Iranians have also been hospitalized for heatstroke and other ailments, according to Iran’s semi-official Tasnim news agency.

According to CNN, the current official death toll from this year’s trip is at least 480.

The death toll is expected to grow significantly further, as Saudi Arabia and Egypt have yet to reveal official data. Furthermore, governments only know about pilgrims who have registered and traveled to Mecca as part of their country’s quota; further deaths are expected among unregistered pilgrims.

This year’s pilgrims endured dangerously high temperatures of up to 49 degrees Celsius (120 degrees Fahrenheit).

According to the Egyptian president, the crisis unit, led by Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouly, will “provide support for families of the deceased.”

According to the statement, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi has also directed the unit to “speedy coordination with Saudi Arabian authorities to facilitate the return of the bodies” of those who died.

According to a statement issued by the Egyptian cabinet on Thursday, the official death toll is 28. However, Reuters news agency and other agencies have reported that up to 500 to 600 Egyptians died on the route.

Egyptian officials said they were striving to compile an exact list of victims and missing persons. The disparity originates from the many unregistered pilgrims who are not considered among those who have registered and traveled to Mecca as part of their country’s quota.

Thousands more were treated for heatstroke as an estimated 1.8 million Muslims braved the sweltering weather.

According to The Associated Press, the Saudi Ministry of Health implemented safety measures such as cooling stations along the official route and encouraged pilgrims to use umbrellas and stay hydrated. Despite this, this year’s celebration was marred by tragedy, raising concerns about whether more could have been done to secure people’s safety.

Nearly 500 Confirmed Fatalities From Hajj Heatwave As Hundreds More Feared Dead

It also emphasizes the dangers posed to the many unregistered worshippers who wish to accomplish their religious duty but do not have Hajj permission and do not have access to official facilities.

At least 68 Jordanians who died of heatstroke while conducting Hajj rituals have been granted burial permission to be laid to rest in Mecca at the request of their families, according to Sufian Qudah, Head of the Jordanian Directorate of Operations and Consular Affairs.

Dr. Mohd Na’im Mokhtar, Malaysia’s Minister for Religious Affairs, stated that the majority of pilgrims died from “heart disease, pneumonia, and blood infection,” according to the state-run Bernama News Agency. The Bernama article did not clarify whether the deceased were part of the country’s official Hajj delegation.

On Friday, a spokesperson for India’s Ministry of External Affairs revealed the deaths of the 98 Indian nationals, saying: “These deaths have happened on account of natural illness, natural causes, chronic illness, and also old age.”

Nearly 500 Confirmed Fatalities From Hajj Heatwave As Hundreds More Feared Dead

On Saturday, the day when Muslims congregate at Mount Arafat, where the Prophet Mohammed is reputed to have delivered his final sermon, six Indian people perished from high heat, while another four died from “accidents,” according to the spokesperson.

In the aftermath of the fatalities, Tunisia’s President Kais Saied fired the country’s minister of religious affairs. Before his dismissal, Ibrahim Chaibi admitted the possibility of negligence in the care of pilgrims. “The negligence could have occurred. It will be present, and we will review it at the ministry level; whomever fails will face consequences,” Chaibi said on Friday.

SOURCE – (CNN)

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Climate Change Made Killer Heat Wave In Mexico, Southwest US Even Warmer And 35 Times More Likely

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Climate | AP news image

Washington — According to a new flash study, human-caused climate change increased the likelihood of this month’s deadly heat in the Southwestern United States, Mexico, and Central America.

Sizzling daytime temperatures that caused heat stroke in parts of the United States were 35 times more likely and 2.5 degrees hotter (1.4 degrees Celsius) as a result of warming caused by the burning of coal, oil and natural gas, World Weather Attribution, a group of scientists who conduct rapid and non-peer reviewed climate attribution studies, calculated Thursday.

“It’s an oven here; you can’t stay here,” 82-year-old Margarita Salazar Pérez of Veracruz, Mexico, remarked from her home without air conditioning. Last week, the Sonoran Desert reached 125 degrees (51.9 degrees Celsius), the hottest day in Mexican history, according to research co-author Shel Winkley, a Climate Central meteorologist.

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Climate | AP News Image

Climate Change Made Killer Heat Wave In Mexico, Southwest US Even Warmer And 35 Times More Likely

According to Friederike Otto, a climate scientist at Imperial College London who leads the attribution study team, this heat wave was deadly because it was significantly worse at night. According to her, climate change has increased nighttime temperatures by 2.9 degrees (1.6 degrees Celsius) and the likelihood of extraordinary evening heat by 200 times.

Salazar Pérez explained that there hasn’t been any cold air at night like people are used to. Doctors think cooler night temperatures are essential for surviving a heat wave.

The World Weather Attribution team reports that at least 125 people have died so far.

“This is clearly related to climate change, the level of intensity that we are seeing, these risks,” said research co-author Karina Izquierdo, a Red Cross and Red Crescent Climate Centre urban advisor located in Mexico City.

The most concerning aspect of this heat wave, which is still heating the North American continent, is that it is no longer considered unusual, according to Otto. The group’s previous studies had looked at heat so intense that it was unthinkable without climate change, but this heat wave was not so much.

“From a weather perspective, it wasn’t uncommon, but the consequences were actually very severe,” Otto told The Associated Press in an interview.

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Climate | AP news Image

Climate Change Made Killer Heat Wave In Mexico, Southwest US Even Warmer And 35 Times More Likely

“The changes we have seen in the last 20 years, which feels like just yesterday, are so strong,” Otto told me. Her research discovered that this heat wave is now four times more likely to occur than in 2000, when temperatures were roughly a degree (0.5 Celsius) lower than they are now. “It seems sort of far away and a different world.”

While other organizations of worldwide scientists — and the global carbon emissions reduction target agreed by governments in the 2015 Paris climate agreement — relate to warming since pre-industrial times in the mid-nineteenth century, Otto believes comparing what is happening now to the year 2000 is more dramatic.

“We’re looking at a shifting baseline – what was once extreme but rare is becoming increasingly common,” said University of Southern California Marine Studies Chair Carly Kenkel, who did not participate in the attribution team’s research. She stated that the analysis represents “the logical conclusion based on the data.”

The study examined a wide range of the continent, including southern California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Belize, and Honduras, as well as the hottest five consecutive days and nights. Most of the area experienced those five days from June 3 to 7 and those five nights from June 5 to 9, but peak heat began on May 26 in a few areas, according to Otto.

On June 4, for example, San Angelo, Texas, set a record high temperature of 111 degrees (43.8 Celsius). According to the National Weather Service, from June 2 to June 6, the night temperature at Corpus Christi airport never went below 80 degrees (26.7 degrees Celsius), a record each night, with two days when the thermometer never dropped below 85 degrees (29.4 degrees Celsius).

According to the National Centre for Environmental Information, between June 1 and June 15, more than 1,200 daytime high-temperature records and almost 1,800 nighttime high-temperature records were tied or broken in the United States.

The attribution team utilized current and prior temperature observations to compare what is happening now to what happened in previous heat waves. They then used the scientifically acknowledged method of comparing models of a hypothetical world without human-caused climate change to present reality to determine how much global warming contributed to the 2024 heat wave.

The immediate meteorological culprit was a high-pressure system camped over central Mexico, which hindered cooling storms and clouds before moving to the Southwest of the United States, which is now delivering heat to the East, according to Winkley. Tropical Storm Alberto emerged on Wednesday and is expected to bring rain to northern Mexico and southern Texas, potentially leading to flooding.

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Climate | AP News Image

Climate Change Made Killer Heat Wave In Mexico, Southwest US Even Warmer And 35 Times More Likely

For months, drought, water shortages, and extreme heat have plagued Mexico and other regions. Due to the warmth, monkeys in Mexico have started dropping from trees.

According to Izquierdo and Kenkel, the current heat wave “exacerbates existing inequalities” between rich and poor in the Americas. The inequalities become most obvious in the night heat, as the capacity to cool down with central air conditioning is determined by how financially secure individuals are, according to Kenkel.

That means Salazar Pérez has been very uncomfortable during this heat wave.

SOURCE – (AP)

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Tropical Storm Alberto Weakens Over Northeast Mexico After Heavy Rains Killed 3

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TAMPICO, MEXICO – Tropical Storm Alberto, the season’s first named storm, weakened Thursday as it headed inland across northeast Mexico after dumping torrential rainfall in areas of the arid region and killing at least three.

The storm swiftly faded over land, and the United States National Hurricane Center reduced it to a tropical depression with maximum sustained winds of 35 mph (55 kmh). Coastal storm watches and warnings in Mexico were withdrawn as Alberto proceeded westward at 18 mph (30 kmh).

However, forecasts predicted several inches of rain were still anticipated inland in Mexico’s Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon, and Coahuila states. South Texas was expected to experience less rain on Thursday.

Immediately after it came ashore in Tampico, there was disappointment at the lack of rain. Showers had been irregular throughout the early morning, with the sun occasionally bursting through.

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Alberto | AP news Image

Tropical Storm Alberto Weakens Over Northeast Mexico After Heavy Rains Killed 3

“We hoped it would come because water is so important here, but as far as I can tell, it went somewhere else,” said Tampico resident Marta Alicia Hernández.

The rain Tampico had hoped for could still be arriving from some of the huge system’s outer bands. Heavy rains were reported inland in the adjacent state of Nuevo Leon.

Civil protection authorities reported three deaths as a result of Alberto’s rains. They said that one guy died in the La Silla River in Monterrey, the state capital, while two kids perished from electric shocks in the municipality of Allende. According to local media, the children were riding bicycles in the rain.

Nuevo Leon Gov. Samuel García said on social media site X that Monterrey metro and public transportation services would be suspended from Wednesday night until midday Thursday when Alberto dies away.

Alberto had prompted tropical storm advisories for most of the western Gulf of Mexico’s coastline, from Texas to Veracruz. The storm landed with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph (75 km/h).

Schools in Tamaulipas state, where Alberto touched ashore, were closed through Friday. Shelters were set up across the state to accommodate residents fleeing flooding.

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Alberto | AP news Image

Tropical Storm Alberto Weakens Over Northeast Mexico After Heavy Rains Killed 3

According to the hurricane center, some portions of northeast Mexico and southern Texas could receive up to 5 inches (13 centimeters) to 10 inches (25 centimeters) of rain, with higher isolated totals likely. Some higher elevations in Mexico could experience up to 20 inches (50 cm) of rain, causing mudslides and flash flooding, particularly in the states of Tamaulipas, Coahuila, and Nuevo Leon.

Mexican authorities had minimized Alberto’s risk, instead relying on its potential to alleviate the region’s water shortage.

“The (wind) speeds are not such as to consider it a risk,” said Tamaulipas state Secretary of Hydrological Resources Raúl Quiroga Álvarez during a news conference late Wednesday. Instead, he urged people to welcome Alberto cheerfully. “This is what we’ve been waiting for for eight years in all of Tamaulipas.”

Much of Mexico has suffered from severe drought, with northern Mexico particularly heavily afflicted. Quiroga highlighted that the state’s reservoirs were depleted, and Mexico owed the United States a significant water debt for their shared usage of the Rio Grande.

“This is a win-win event for Tamaulipas,” he told reporters.

Alberto was also causing rain and floods along the Texas coast.

According to the National Weather Service, the major hazard for southern coastal Texas is flooding caused by excessive rain. On Wednesday, the NWS stated that there is “a high probability” of flash flooding in southern coastal Texas. Tornadoes and waterspouts are possible.

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Alberto | AP News Image

Tropical Storm Alberto Weakens Over Northeast Mexico After Heavy Rains Killed 3

On Wednesday, areas along the Texas coast experienced road flooding and severe rip currents, while waterspouts were reported offshore.

Octavio González, a Tampico resident, was noticeably disappointed with Alberto’s light rain.

“Very little water fell,” he explained. “We are experiencing severe drought on the south side of Tamaulipas. And the truth is, we have a lot of optimism for rain.”

SOURCE – (AP)

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