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Jerry Springer, Politician-Turned-TV Ringmaster, Dies At 79

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CINCINNATI, Ohio – Jerry Springer, the 79-year-old former mayor and television anchor whose namesake TV show featured a three-ring circus of dysfunctional families eager to bare all on weekday afternoons, including brawls, vulgarity, and blurred images of nudity, died Thursday.

In its heyday, “The Jerry Springer Show” was a rating juggernaut and a cultural pariah in the United States, synonymous with filthy drama. Over its 27-year history, the daytime talk show was a favorite American guilty pleasure, beating Oprah Winfrey’s show at one point. It was known for chair-throwing and bleep-filled confrontations.

Springer described it as “escapist entertainment,” while others saw it as contributing to the dumbing-down of American societal ideals.

“Jerry’s ability to connect with people was at the heart of his success in everything he tried, whether that was politics, broadcasting, or just joking with people on the street who wanted a photo or a word,” Jene Galvin, a family representative and Springer’s friend since 1970, said in a statement. “He is irreplaceable, and his loss is heartbreaking, but memories of his intellect, heart, and sense of humor will live on.”

jerry spinger

According to the statement, Jerry Springer died quietly at home in suburban Chicago following a brief illness.

Springer joked on Twitter that he was a “talk show host, ringmaster of civilization’s end.” He’d also told folks, jokingly, that his desire for them was “may you never be on my show.”

The show terminated in 2018 after more than 4,000 episodes, never veering from its fundamental salaciousness: some of its final episodes had names like “Stripper Sex Turned Me Straight,” “Stop Pimpin’ My Twin Sister,” and “Hooking Up With My Therapist.”

Springer provided a defense against distaste in a “Too Hot For TV” film broadcast in the late 1990s when his daily program approached 7 million viewers.

“Look, television does not and must not create values; it is simply a picture of everything that is out there — the good, the bad, and the ugly,” Springer said, adding, “Believe this: The politicians and companies that seek to control what each of us may watch are a far greater danger to America and our prized freedom than any of our guests have ever been or could be.”

He also claimed that the participants in his show volunteered to be subjected to whatever scorn or humiliation was in store.

Gerald Norman Springer was born on February 13, 1944, at a London tube station used as a bomb shelter. His parents, Richard and Margot, were German Jews who fled to England during the Holocaust, resulting in numerous relatives’ deaths in Nazi gas chambers. They moved to the United States when their kid was five years old and resided in the Queens neighborhood of New York City, where Springer acquired his first Yankees baseball gear and became a lifetime admirer.

He attended Tulane University for political science and Northwestern University for law. He was involved in politics for much of his adult life, even considering a bid for governor of Ohio in 2017.

He started as an adviser in Robert F. Kennedy’s disastrous 1968 presidential campaign. Springer, who worked for a law company in Cincinnati, campaigned unsuccessfully for Congress in 1970 before being elected to the city council in 1971.

Jerry Springer resigned in 1974, citing “an abrupt move that shook Cincinnati’s political community” in The Cincinnati Enquirer. He claimed “very personal family considerations,” although he did not disclose a vice investigation involving prostitution. Springer later admitted to paying prostitutes with personal checks, which could have been the subject of one of his future episodes.

jerry spinger

Jerry Springer considered a Senate run in 2003.

He had married Micki Velton the previous year when he was 30. Katie was born to her parents, who divorced in 1994.

Springer soon rose through the political ranks, obtaining a council member in 1975 and then mayor in 1977. He then became a renowned nighttime political commentator on local television. He and co-anchor Norma Rashid eventually helped NBC station WLWT-TV’s broadcast become the top-rated news show in the Cincinnati market.

Springer’s talk show debuted in 1991 with a more traditional structure, but after he departed WLWT in 1993, it was given a sleazy makeover.

It was voted No. 1 on TV Guide’s list of the “Worst Shows in Television History,” but it was rated gold. Springer became a superstar as a result, and she went on to host a liberal radio talk show and “America’s Got Talent,” star in the film “Ringmaster,” and compete in “Dancing With the Stars.”

“With all of the joking I do with the show, I’m fully aware and thank God every day that my life has taken this incredible turn because of this silly show,” Springer said to Cincinnati Enquirer media reporter John Kiesewetter in 2011.

Jerry Springer considered a Senate run in 2003, even before Donald Trump’s political rise from reality TV celebrity, hoping to attract “nontraditional voters,” individuals “who believe most politics are bull.”

“I connect with a whole bunch of people who probably connect to me right now more than a traditional politician,” Springer. He opposed the Iraq war and supported increasing public healthcare but did not run.

jerry spinger

Jerry Springer also frequently referred to the country he immigrated to at age five as “a beacon of light for the rest of the world.”

Jerry Springer told a Democratic rally in 2003, “I have no other motivation than to say I love this country.”

Jerry Springer had a nationally syndicated “Judge Jerry” show in 2019 and continued to speak out on a podcast about anything that was on his mind, but his shock value had dwindled in the new era of reality television and combative cable TV talk shows.

David Bianculli, a professor at Monmouth University and a television historian, claimed in 2018 that “real life lapped him not only by other programs but by other programs.”

Despite the constraints Springer’s show imposed on his political ambitions, he accepted its legacy. Springer mentioned a quotation by then-National Review pundit Jonah Goldberg in a 2003 fund-raising infomercial ahead of a probable U.S. Senate candidature the following year, who warned of new people brought to the polls by Springer, including “slack-jawed yokels, hicks, weirdos, pervs, and whatnots.”

Springer mentioned the quote in the infomercial and wanted to reach out to “regulators.”

SOURCE – (AP)

Kiara Grace is a staff writer at VORNews, a reputable online publication. Her writing focuses on technology trends, particularly in the realm of consumer electronics and software. With a keen eye for detail and a knack for breaking down complex topics, Kiara delivers insightful analyses that resonate with tech enthusiasts and casual readers alike. Her articles strike a balance between in-depth coverage and accessibility, making them a go-to resource for anyone seeking to stay informed about the latest innovations shaping our digital world.

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OJ Simpson, Fallen Football Hero Acquitted Of Murder In ‘Trial Of The Century,’ Dies At 76

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OJ Simpson

LAS VEGAS — O.J. Simpson, the renowned football player and Hollywood actor who was acquitted of murdering his former wife and a friend but found guilty in a separate civil trial, has died. He was 76.

Simpson died of prostate cancer on Wednesday, according to his family, who announced it on his official X account. Simpson’s attorney told TMZ on Thursday that he died in Las Vegas.

Simpson rose to fame, money, and admiration in football and show business, but his legacy was irrevocably altered by the June 1994 knife murders of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend Ronald Goldman in Los Angeles.

simpson

OJ Simpson, Fallen Football Hero Acquitted Of Murder In ‘Trial Of The Century,’ Dies At 76

Live T.V. coverage of his arrest during a historic slow-speed chase signaled a precipitous fall from grace.

He appeared to transcend racial barriers as a star Trojan tailback for the powerful University of Southern California in the late 1960s, a rental car ad pitchman rushing through airports in the late 1970s, and the husband of a blond and blue-eyed high school homecoming queen in the 1980s.

“I’m not Black, I’m O.J.,” he would tell friends.

His “trial of the century” captivated the audience on live television. His case raised discussions about racism, gender, domestic violence, celebrity justice, and police wrongdoing.

A criminal court jury found him not guilty of murder in 1995, but a separate civil trial jury found him accountable for the murders in 1997 and ordered him to pay $33.5 million to Brown and Goldman’s families.

Ten years later, Simpson led five men he hardly knew into a fight with two sports memorabilia dealers in a cramped hotel room in Las Vegas, still troubled by the California wrongful death verdict. Simpson was accompanied by two men armed with firearms. A jury found Simpson guilty of armed robbery and other offenses.

He was imprisoned at the age of 61 and spent nine years in a remote northern Nevada prison, including time as a gym janitor. He was not remorseful when he was freed on parole in October 2017. The parole board heard him argue once more that he was merely seeking to recover sports memorabilia and family heirlooms stolen from him following his criminal trial in Los Angeles.

“I’ve basically spent a conflict-free life, you know,” said Simpson, whose parole expires in late 2021.

The public’s interest in Simpson remained strong. Many people questioned whether he was punished in Las Vegas after his acquittal in Los Angeles. In 2016, he was the focus of a five-part ESPN documentary and an F.X. mini-series.

“I don’t think most of America believes I did it,” Simpson told The New York Times in 1995, a week after a jury ruled he did not murder Brown and Goldman. “I’ve gotten thousands of letters and telegrams from people supporting me.”

Twelve years later, in response to widespread public outcry, Rupert Murdoch shelved a proposed book by News Corp.-owned HarperCollins in which Simpson presented his hypothetical account of the murders. It was supposed to be titled “If I Did It.”

Goldman’s family, which is currently pursuing the multimillion-dollar wrongful death claim, obtained custody of the text. They retitled the book “If I Did It: Confessions of the Killer.”

“It’s all blood money, and unfortunately, I had to join the jackals,” Simpson told the Associated Press at the time. He received $880,000 in advance payments for the book via a third party.

“It helped me get out of debt and secure my homestead,” he told me.

Less than two months after losing the book rights, Simpson was jailed in Las Vegas.

simpson

OJ Simpson, Fallen Football Hero Acquitted Of Murder In ‘Trial Of The Century,’ Dies At 76

David Cook, an attorney who has been pursuing the civil judgment in the Goldman case since 2008, said he spoke with Ron’s father, Fred, on Thursday about Simpson’s death. Cook refuses to reveal what Fred Goldman had said or where he was.

“He died without penance,” Cook said of Simpson. “We have yet to learn what he has, where it is, or who is in control. We shall continue from where we are.

Simpson spent nine of his 11 NFL seasons with the Buffalo Bills, earning the nickname “The Juice” as part of an offensive line known as “The Electric Company.” He won four NFL rushing titles, amassed 11,236 yards, scored 76 touchdowns, and appeared in five Pro Bowls. His best season was 1973, when he rushed for 2,003 yards, becoming the first running back to reach that milestone.

“I was a part of the history of the game,” he said years later. “If I did nothing else in my life, I’d made my mark.”

Of course, Simpson went on to achieve more renown.

One of the items from his murder trial, the meticulously fitted tan suit he wore when acquitted, was later donated and displayed at the Newseum in Washington. Simpson was assured that the outfit would be at his hotel room in Las Vegas, but it wasn’t.

Orenthal James Simpson was born in San Francisco on July 9, 1947. He grew up in government-subsidized housing developments.

Following graduation from high school, he attended City College of San Francisco for a year and a half before moving to the University of Southern California for the spring 1967 semester.

He married his first wife, Marguerite Whitley, on June 24, 1967, and moved her to Los Angeles the next day to begin preparation for his first season with USC, which won the national championship that year largely due to Simpson’s contributions.

simpson

OJ Simpson, Fallen Football Hero Acquitted Of Murder In ‘Trial Of The Century,’ Dies At 76

Simpson won the Heisman Trophy in 1968. He accepted the statue on the same day as the birth of his first child, Arnelle.

He had two kids with his first wife, Jason and Aaren. One of them, Aaren, drowned as a toddler in a swimming pool accident in 1979, the same year he and Whitley divorced.

Simpson and Brown got married in 1985. They had two kids, Justin and Sydney, and divorced in 1992. Nicole Brown Simpson was found killed two years after she disappeared.

“We don’t need to go back and relive the worst day of our lives,” he told the Associated Press 25 years after the double homicide. “The topic of the moment is one I will never revisit again. My family and I have moved on to the ‘no negative zone.’ We focus on the positives.”

SOURCE – (AP)

 

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‘Fallout’ Surfaces As A Series That Gets Lost In The Game-To-Screen Wastelands

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“Fallout” debuts in such an appealing way – at a kid’s birthday party, of all places – that the Amazon series seemed poised to join “The Last of Us” in perfecting the transition from game to screen. As the first season unfolds, this post-apocalyptic concept feels closer to “Twisted Metal” as it becomes lost in the wastelands, carrying a deep mythology that mirrors “Westworld” in its broader, more cynical vision of the world.

That latter parallel hardly seems coincidental, given that the new series is overseen by Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy, who created “Westworld,” one of TV’s most captivating programs until, unexpectedly, it wasn’t. While “Fallout” should pique the interest of fans of the Tim Cain-created game, its broader appeal appears unlikely to rival the HBO above hits, despite an impressive visual palette and a mix of quirkiness and gruesome violence that is better balanced in Amazon’s signature series “The Boys.”

fallout

‘Fallout’ Surfaces As A Series That Gets Lost In The Game-To-Screen Wastelands

Even trying to summarize the tale of “Fallout” gives an idea of how complex the structure is, at least until its parallel threads begin to converge. The initial focus is on vault dwellers who have remained underground for more than 200 years following nuclear catastrophe, attempting to “keep the candle of civilization lit,” as their leader puts it.

Soon, their reverie is disrupted, and one of their number, Lucy (“Yellowjackets'” Ella Purnell), sets out on a mission that leads her deep into the cruel world above.

There, the wide-eyed Lucy encounters irradiated monsters galore: metal-clad knights (think Iron Man, but clunkier), with Aaron Moten playing a squire for a militaristic group known as the Brotherhood of Steel; and a character known as the Ghoul (Walton Goggins), a mutated bounty hunter whose nose-less visage resembles Marvel’s Red Skull, with a backstory that provides the show’s strongest mythological hook.

“I hate it up here,” Lucy says early on, and considering the horrors she’s seen, who could blame her? Her journey, however, includes not just carnage but also insights about her society and its beginnings, as well as brief contacts (some brief) with a talented cast of co-stars such as Moisés Arias, Kyle MacLachlan, Sarita Choudhury, Michael Emerson, and Leslie Uggams.

fallout

‘Fallout’ Surfaces As A Series That Gets Lost In The Game-To-Screen Wastelands

After overseeing “The Peripheral,” Nolan (Christopher Nolan’s brother and frequent collaborator) directs the first three of the eight episodes, establishing the darkly comic, sci-fi/western tone and a scale that suggests this is another major bet for Prime Video.

Charitably, the eight episodes merely scratch the surface of the premise’s rich story potential, which structurally may set up “Fallout” for the long run, similar to the recent (and more effective) “3 Body Problem.” The show has already earned tax incentives from the state of California, making a second season more appealing.

fallout

‘Fallout’ Surfaces As A Series That Gets Lost In The Game-To-Screen Wastelands

Even still, as Season 1 comes to a close, there’s less excitement for what comes next and more relief that this somewhat clumsy debut, with its motley pool of players, is finally finished.

As previously said, there is plenty of room to further explore the world of “Fallout.” Still, based on the trajectory of game-to-screen translations, witnessing this candle go out would not feel like the end of the world.

SOURCE – (CNN)

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Morgan Wallen Has Been Arrested After Police Say He Threw A Chair Off Of The Roof Of A 6-Story Bar

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Nashville, Tennessee – Morgan Wallen, a country music singer, has been detained after allegedly throwing a chair from the rooftop of a recently opened six-story club in downtown Nashville.

Metro Nashville Police stated that Wallen, 30, was booked into jail early Monday on three felony counts of reckless endangerment and one misdemeanor count of disorderly conduct.

wallen

Morgan Wallen Has Been Arrested After Police Say He Threw A Chair Off Of The Roof Of A 6-Story Bar

A chair was hurled from the rooftop of Chief’s Bar and landed on Broadway near two police officers, prompting the accusations.

According to the arrest affidavit, the chair landed about 3 feet (1 meter) from cops, who spoke with witnesses and watched security footage. Witnesses informed police that they saw Wallen take up a chair, throw it over the roof, and laugh about it.

Worrick Robinson, Wallen’s attorney, confirmed the singer’s arrest late Sunday and claimed she was completely cooperating with police. He was freed from detention and had a court appointment planned for May 3.

wallen

Morgan Wallen Has Been Arrested After Police Say He Threw A Chair Off Of The Roof Of A 6-Story Bar

Wallen is one of the most well-known figures in the country at present. His third studio album, 2023’s “One Thing at a Time,” was the best-selling album in the United States last year. It spent 16 weeks at the top of the Billboard 200 in 2023, which means he was at No. 1 for 30% of the year, more than any other album since Adele’s “21” dominated over ten years earlier. It had numerous top ten Billboard Hot 100 successes, including “Last Night,” “You Proof,” “Thinkin’ Bout Me,” “Thought You Should Know,” and “Don’t Think Jesus.”

After a video surfaced of him uttering a racial slur, the country artist was suspended indefinitely by his label, and his songs were removed from radio stations and streaming services in 2021. As a result, he was disqualified or limited from various award events and did not earn any Grammy nominations for his best-selling “Dangerous: The Double Album.”

He was arrested in 2020 for public intoxication and disorderly conduct after being booted out of Kid Rock’s downtown Nashville bar.

wallen

Morgan Wallen Has Been Arrested After Police Say He Threw A Chair Off Of The Roof Of A 6-Story Bar

Wallen claimed on social media that he and several friends were “horse-playing” after a few pub stops.

“We didn’t mean any harm, and we want to say sorry to any bar staff or anyone that was affected,” Wallen wrote on Facebook. “I want to thank the local authorities for being so professional and doing their jobs with class. Love you all.”

SOURCE – (AP)

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