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Scream VI Tops Oscars Weekend Raking in $44.5M

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Scream VI Tops Oscars Weekend

According to studio estimates, “Scream VI” had the best Oscar weekend in theatres, grossing a franchise-high $44.5 million in domestic ticket sales.

The co-production between Paramount Pictures and Spyglass Media Group easily outperformed expectations, grossing $32 million more than the previous series high of $32 million set by “Scream 2” in 1997. The film’s strong opening, which came as Hollywood prepared for the 95th Academy Awards, was another reminder of how horror has become one of the industry’s few sure bets at the box office.

The “Scream” franchise, previously directed by Wes Craven and distributed by Dimension Films, has found a ripe revival with a young cast led by “Wednesday” stars Jenna Ortega and Melissa Barrera.

Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett have returned the meta-slasher storylines and serial killer Ghostface from the 27-year-old series, which is paying off. Last year’s “Scream V” grossed $137 million worldwide on a $24 million production budget. Courtney Cox reprises her role as reporter Gale Weathers in the latest installment, as does Hayden Panettiere, a veteran of “Scream IV.” However, it is the first “Scream” film without Neve Campbell.


“Scream VI,” quickly greenlit following the success of “V,” has also done well with critics and audiences.

It has a 75% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. It received a “B+” CinemaScore, which is a respectable rating for a horror film. The sixth “Scream,” which cost $33 million to produce, brought in an additional $22.6 million overseas.

“Creed III,” last week’s top film, fell to second after an above-expectations debut. MGM’s “Rocky” spinoff starring Michael B. Jordan and Jonathan Majors earned $27.1 million in its second weekend. It has quickly surpassed US and Canadian theatres‘ $100 million mark.

“65,” a science-fiction thriller starring Adam Driver as a space explorer stranded on prehistoric Earth, debuted in third place with an estimated $12.3 million from 3,405 locations and an additional $7.2 million worldwide. That could be better than expected for a film that received negative reviews from critics. (On Rotten Tomatoes, it received only 35% fresh.) However, “65” reportedly had a $90 million production budget, though tax breaks cut that cost in half for financiers such as Sony, Bron Studios, and TSG.

“Champions,” directed by Bobby Farrelly and starring Woody Harrelson as a disgraced coach attempting to lead a basketball team to the Special Olympics, grossed $5.2 million in 3,030 theatres. Audiences (with an “A” CinemaScore) rated it higher than critics (53% on Rotten Tomatoes).

Comscore estimates ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at US and Canadian theatres.

1. “Scream VI,” $44.5 million.

2. “Creed III,” $27.1 million.

3. “65,” $12.3 million.

4. “Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania,” $7 million.

5. “Cocaine Bear,” $6.2 million.

6. “Jesus Revolution,” $5.2 million.

7. “Champions,” $5.2 million.

8. “Avatar: The Way of Water,” $2.7 million.

9. “Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba: To the Swords,” $1.9 million.

10. “Puss in Boots: The Last Wish,” $1.7 million.

Geoff Thomas is a seasoned staff writer at VORNews, a reputable online publication. With his sharp writing skills and deep understanding of SEO, he consistently delivers high-quality, engaging content that resonates with readers. Thomas' articles are well-researched, informative, and written in a clear, concise style that keeps audiences hooked. His ability to craft compelling narratives while seamlessly incorporating relevant keywords has made him a valuable asset to the VORNews team.

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Taylor Swift Stuns London Crowd By Bringing Travis Kelce On Stage During Eras Tour Concert

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Taylor Swift feels that being “Instagram official” with Travis Kelce isn’t enough.

Swift went one step further on Sunday, according to social media videos from the event, bringing Kelce on stage with her during her Eras Tour concert at London’s Wembley Stadium.

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Taylor Swift | ELLE Image

Taylor Swift Stuns London Crowd By Bringing Travis Kelce On Stage During Eras Tour Concert

The football star’s big moment occurred amid a shift in Swift’s “Tortured Poets Department” setlist. He was greeted with boisterous yells and acclaim when he initially emerged on stage, dressed in a top hat and a black tailcoat and holding Swift in his arms.

Kelce fanned himself with a hand fan, twirled around, and grinned at Swift while her dancers assisted her with an onstage outfit change.

Swift looked to blow Kelce a kiss before walking away to sing “I Can Do It With a Broken Heart.”

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Taylor Swift | Yahoo Image

Taylor Swift Stuns London Crowd By Bringing Travis Kelce On Stage During Eras Tour Concert

Swift introduced the skit into her act in May after she altered her Eras Tour setlist to include some songs from her most recent album, “The Tortured Poets Department,” which was released in April.

Swift uploaded a photo on Saturday of herself and Kelce posing for a selfie with Prince William and his two children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte, who came to her concert to honor the Prince of Wales’ 42nd birthday.

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Taylor Swift | Page Six Image

Taylor Swift Stuns London Crowd By Bringing Travis Kelce On Stage During Eras Tour Concert

The snapshot is the first Kelce Swift uploaded on her regular Instagram profile, marking their “Instagram official” post.

Swift and the three-time Super Bowl champion first became romantically involved in September.

SOURCE – (CNN)

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Donald Sutherland, The Towering Actor Whose Career Spanned ‘M.A.S.H.’ To ‘Hunger Games,’ Dies At 88

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NEW YORK — Donald Sutherland, a famous film and television actor whose work ranged from “M.A.S.H.” to “The Hunger Games,” has died. He was 88.

The actor’s son, Kiefer Sutherland, confirmed his father’s death Thursday. No other information was immediately provided.

“I personally think one of the most important actors in the history of film,” Kiefer Sutherland stated on X. “Never intimidated by a part, whether good, awful, or ugly. He loved what he did and did what he loved, and you can’t ask for more.”

The tall and gaunt Canadian actor with a charming or wicked grin was recognized for oddball characters like Hawkeye Pierce in Robert Altman’s “M.A.S.H.,” the hippy tank commander in “Kelly’s Heroes,” and the stoned professor in “Animal House.”

Before starting a long career as a respected character actor, Sutherland exemplified 1970s cinema’s unconventional, anti-establishment style.

Over the years, Sutherland demonstrated his versatility in more conventional but unconventional roles like Robert Redford’s “Ordinary People” and Oliver Stone’s “JFK.” More recently, he appeared in the “Hunger Games” movies. He never retired and worked frequently till his death. “Made Up, But Still True,” a memoir, was scheduled to be released in November.

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Sutherland | AP News Image

Donald Sutherland, The Towering Actor Whose Career Spanned ‘M.A.S.H.’ To ‘Hunger Games,’ Dies At 88

“I enjoy working. In 1998, Sutherland told Charlie Rose, “I passionately love to work.” “I adore seeing my hand fit into the glove of another figure. I get a great sense of freedom; time seems to halt. I’m not as crazy as I used to be, but I’m still slightly insane.”

Donald McNichol Sutherland was born in St. John, New Brunswick, the son of a salesperson and a math teacher. He was up in Nova Scotia and was a disc jockey with his radio station by age 14.

“When I was 13 or 14, I really thought everything I felt was wrong and dangerous, and that God was going to kill me for it,” said Sutherland to The New York Times in 1981. “My father always said, ‘Keep your mouth shut, Donnie, and maybe people will think you have character.'”

Sutherland began as an engineering student at the University of Toronto but switched to English and began acting in school plays. While studying in Toronto, he met an aspiring actress named Lois Hardwick. They married in 1959 and divorced seven years later.

Sutherland graduated in 1956 and studied acting at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts. Sutherland began performing in West End shows and on British television. He bounced around after moving to Los Angeles until a series of war films altered his path.

His first American picture was “The Dirty Dozen” (1967), in which he played Vernon Pinkley, an officer mimicking psychotic. In 1970, the World War II drama “Kelly’s Heroes” and “M.A.S.H.,” an acclaimed smash hit, were released, catapulting Sutherland to fame.

“There is more challenge in character roles,” Sutherland told The Washington Post in 1970. “There is longevity. A good character actor can portray a distinct face in each film without boring the audience.”

If Sutherland had gotten his way, Altman would have been sacked from “M.A.S.H.” He and co-star Elliott Gould were dissatisfied with the director’s unconventional, improvisational approach and lobbied to have him changed. But the picture outperformed everyone’s expectations, and Sutherland personally resonated with its anti-war message. Sutherland, actress Jane Fonda, and others created the Free Theater Associates in 1971 after being outspokenly opposed to the Vietnam War. In 1973, they performed in venues near military facilities in Southeast Asia after being banned by the Army for their political ideas.

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Sutherland | AP News Image

Donald Sutherland, The Towering Actor Whose Career Spanned ‘M.A.S.H.’ To ‘Hunger Games,’ Dies At 88

Sutherland’s career as a leading man peaked in the 1970s, when he starred in pictures by the greatest directors of the day, even if they didn’t always perform their best work with him. Sutherland, who repeatedly stated that he regarded himself at the service of a director’s vision, collaborated with Federico Fellini (1976’s “Fellini’s Casanova”), Bernardo Bertolucci (1976’s “1900”), Claude Chabrol (1978’s “Blood Relatives”), and John Schlesinger (1975’s “The Day of the Locust”).

One of his most memorable performances was as a detective in Alan Pakula’s “Klute” (1971). He met Fonda while filming “Klute,” they had a three-year relationship that began after his second marriage to actor Shirley Douglas ended. He married Douglas in 1966 and divorced in 1971.

In 1966, Sutherland and Douglas welcomed twins Rachel and Kiefer, named after Warren Kiefer, the writer of Sutherland’s first film, “Castle of the Living Dead.”

In 1974, the actor began living with actress Francine Racette, with whom he remained ever since. They had three children: Roeg, born in 1974 and named after filmmaker Nicolas Roeg (“Don’t Look Now”); Rossif, born in 1978 and named after director Frederick Rossif; and Angus Redford, born in 1979 and named after Robert Redford.

To some astonishment, Redford cast Sutherland as the father in his directorial debut, 1980’s “Ordinary People.” Redford’s drama about a gorgeous suburban family shattered by tragedy received four Academy Awards, including Best Picture.

The academy neglected Sutherland for the majority of his career. He was never nominated, but he received an honorary Oscar in 2017. He did, however, win an Emmy in 1995 for the television film “Citizen X” and was nominated for seven Golden Globes (including for his roles in “M.A.S.H.” and “Ordinary People”), winning two — again for “Citizen X” and for the 2003 television film “Path to War.”

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Sutherland | AP News Image

Donald Sutherland, The Towering Actor Whose Career Spanned ‘M.A.S.H.’ To ‘Hunger Games,’ Dies At 88

“Ordinary People” also signaled a transition in Sutherland’s career toward more mature and, in some cases, less eccentric characters.

However, his New York stage debut in 1981 was a disaster. He played Humbert Humbert in Edward Albee’s version of Vladimir Nabokov’s “Lolita,” which received harsh reviews and closed after only a dozen performances.

A slump ensued in the 1980s, owing to flops such as the 1981 satire “Gas” and the 1984 comedy “Crackers.”

Sutherland, however, persisted in his efforts. He has a brief but noteworthy appearance in Oliver Stone’s film “JFK” (1991). He returned to play a grandpa for Redford in his 1993 film “Six Degrees of Separation.” He played Bill Bowerman, a track coach, in the 1998 film Without Limits.

Sutherland has worked more on television over the last decade, most notably in HBO’s “Path to War,” when he played President Lyndon Johnson’s Secretary of Defense Clark Clifford. It was an appropriate, albeit ironic, bookend to a career began by “M.A.S.H.”

SOURCE – (AP)

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After Drake Battle, Kendrick Lamar Turns Victory Lap Concert Into LA Unity Celebration

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Kendrick Lamar | AP news Image

Inglewood, California – Kendrick Lamar’s Juneteenth “Pop Out” event at the Forum became an emotional live-streamed celebration of Los Angeles unity rather than simply taking a victory lap after defeating fellow rap artist Drake.

Lamar organized a three-hour event that included a combination of up-and-coming LA rappers and stars such as Tyler, The Creator, Steve Lacy, and YG. When it came to his turn to take the stage, the 37-year-old rapper pushed through a set with Black Hippy collaborators Schoolboy Q, Ab-Soul, and Jay Rock, performing his Drake diss songs “Euphoria” and “6:16 in LA,” before being joined on stage by Dr. Dre.

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Lamar | Billboard

After Drake Battle, Kendrick Lamar Turns Victory Lap Concert Into LA Unity Celebration

The two West Coast titans played “Still D.R.E.” and “California Love” before Dre called for silence to calm the raging crowd. It was a misdirect. He then gave the “Sixth Sense” phrase that opens Lamar’s smash hit “Not Like Us”: “I see dead people.”

A crowd of 17,000 people, including The Weeknd, LeBron James, Ayo Edebiri, and Rick Ross, rapped along to every word of the biting-but-jubilant DJ Mustard track, which Lamar resumed twice after the first verse and repeated four times in total.

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Lamar | BBC Image

After Drake Battle, Kendrick Lamar Turns Victory Lap Concert Into LA Unity Celebration

NBA stars Russell Westbrook and DeMar DeRozan, Mustard, rapper Roddy Ricch, and even a juvenile dance group led by krumping inventor Tommy the Clown were shuffling, frolicking, dancing, and twirling around him as Lamar approached the stage in a red sweatshirt.

Lamar delighted in the situation, saying, “Y’all ain’t gonna let nobody disrespect the West Coast.” “You’re not going to let anyone imitate our legends, huh,” he asked, referring to Drake’s usage of an AI program to mimic 2Pac’s voice on one of his diss tracks.

But Lamar had bigger plans, inviting select men and women to join him onstage for a group portrait.

“Let the world see this,” he urged. “For all of us to be on this stage together, unity, from the East side… LA, Crips, Bloods, Piru— this… is great, dude. We put this together exclusively for you guys.

“This… has nothing to do with any song at this time, nothing to do with any back-and-forth albums; it has everything to do with this particular moment. That’s what this… was about bringing us all together.

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Lamar | Variety Image

After Drake Battle, Kendrick Lamar Turns Victory Lap Concert Into LA Unity Celebration

After the final song, Lamar exited, stating, “I promise you, this won’t be the last of us.” The slicing horns of the “Not Like Us” instrument rang out again, and the audience rapped the words without Lamar as they flowed down the hallways and out to the parking lot.

SOURCE – (AP)

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