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2024: Supreme Court Rules California Man Can’t Trademark ‘Trump Too Small’

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Trump | Pixa Bay Image

WASHINGTON The Supreme Court decided unanimously on Thursday against a man seeking to trademark the oblique phrase “Trump too small.”

The court maintained that the government had the right to refuse Steve Elster, a Californian who wanted to use the slogan only on T-shirts and maybe other products, a trademark. It is one of many legal proceedings involving former President Donald Trump, including significant ones about the bloody assault on the Capitol in 2021. The court established guidelines earlier in the current term enabling public officials to be sued for removing detractors from their social media accounts. These instances had to do with Donald as well.

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trump | AP News image

Supreme Court Rules California Man Can’t Trademark ‘Trump Too Small’

The Justice Department backed President Joe Biden’s presumed opponent in the 2024 election, his predecessor. According to government representatives, the phrase “Trump too small” may still be used, but as Donald had not given his approval, it could not be trademarked. You can already buy “Trump too small” T-shirts online.

Elster’s attorneys had contended that the ruling infringed his right to free speech, and a federal appeals court agreed.

Chief Justice John Roberts warned at arguments that if Elster prevailed, individuals would rush to trademark “Trump too this, Trump too that.”

While the nine judges unanimously agreed to reject Elster’s First Amendment argument, their reasoning varied and comprised 53 pages of opinions.

In the last six years, the justices have twice overturned federal law clauses that denied trademarks deemed scandalous or immoral in one case and insulting in another.

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Trump | PixaBay Image

Supreme Court Rules California Man Can’t Trademark

Elster’s case addressed a different rule that states that unless the person has provided “written consent,” a trademark application containing a name, photograph, or signature “identifying a particular living individual” will be denied.

The core of the lawsuit refers to a conversation Donald had with Florida Senator Marco Rubio during the 2016 campaign. At the time, Rubio was vying for the Republican presidential nomination.

At a speech, Rubio started the verbal sparring by telling supporters that Donald, who claims to be 6 feet 3 inches tall, had disproportionately small hands and that Donald had always called him “little Marco.” Had you looked at his hands? And you are aware of the saying regarding males with little hands, Rubio added. “You can’t rely on them.”

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Trump | Pixa Bay Image

Supreme Court Rules California Man Can’t Trademark ‘Trump Too Small’

Donald later brought up the remark during a televised debate on March 3, 2016.

Stare at those hands. Are those little hands? And he said something about my hands being small, so something else had to be, too. There is no difficulty, I promise you. You have my word,” he declared.

SOURCE – (AP)

Kiara Grace is a staff writer at VORNews, a reputable online publication. Her writing focuses on technology trends, particularly in the realm of consumer electronics and software. With a keen eye for detail and a knack for breaking down complex topics, Kiara delivers insightful analyses that resonate with tech enthusiasts and casual readers alike. Her articles strike a balance between in-depth coverage and accessibility, making them a go-to resource for anyone seeking to stay informed about the latest innovations shaping our digital world.

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Fandango Founder, Michael Cline Identified As Man Who Fell To Death From New York City Hotel

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Michael Cline | CNN Image

J. Michael Cline, the founder of movie ticket company Fandango, died after falling from a New York City hotel on Tuesday, a law enforcement official told CNN.

According to the New York Police Department, the 64-year-old was discovered at 10 a.m. on Tuesday with injuries consistent with falling from an elevated height from The Kimberly Hotel, a luxury boutique hotel in midtown Manhattan. Investigators suspect he jumped from the hotel’s 20th floor. He was declared dead shortly after that by emergency medical responders.

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Michael Cline | CNN Image

Fandango Founder, Michael Cline Identified As Man Who Fell To Death From New York City Hotel

According to LinkedIn, Cline established Fandango in 1999 and continued to work there until 2011. NBCUniversal now owns the ticket company.

Cline was a founding and managing partner of Accretive Private Equity and executive chairman of Juxtapose Venture Fund when he died. He had also created several more enterprises.

Cline was chairman of the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, where he talked about the significance of conservation efforts in 2020.

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Michael Cline | Page Six Image

Fandango Founder, Michael Cline Identified As Man Who Fell To Death From New York City Hotel

Michael was married and father of six children. According to the HBS alumni association website, he obtained his bachelor’s degree from Cornell University and his MBA from Harvard Business School.

SOURCE | CNN

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Risk-Averse Companies Choose CrowdStrike for Cybersecurity. The Software is Causing chaos.

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(AP Photo/Haven Daley)

(VOR News) – Airlines, banks, hospitals, and other risk-averse institutions worldwide have chosen cybersecurity firm CrowdStrike to protect their computer systems against hackers and data breaches.

But all it took was one misplaced CrowdStrike software update to cause worldwide havoc on Friday, including flight cancellations, Closure of banks and media outlets, and the interruption of hospitals, shops, and other services.

According to Cornell University assistant professor of engineering Gregory Falco, “This is a consequence of the highly homogeneous technology that provides the foundation for our entire IT infrastructure.”

“The root of this crisis is the fact that we are dependent on a small number of companies, and everyone employs the same individuals, resulting in a collective collapse.”

CrowdStrike says there was no hacking or cyberattack.

The business issued an apology and said that a fix was being prepared. But it turned out to be a difficult problem to fix. Analyst for Gartner Eric Grenier said that cleanup required “boots on the ground.”

Grenier said, “The fix is functional; however, it is a highly manual process and there is no magic key to unlock it.” “I believe that is the most significant challenge that companies are currently facing.”

Among the most well-known cybersecurity companies are CrowdStrike and its Falcon platform, which is not available to everyone. This is especially true for the banking and transportation industries, where the efficiency of computer systems is critical.

“They are typically risk-averse organizations that prefer something that is not only workable but also provides a safety net in the event of a mishap.” Falco said, “That is the essence of CrowdStrike.”

“They are observing their colleagues in other sectors and remarking, ‘Oh, you know, this company also uses that, so I’m going to need them, too.'”

It is hardly new to voice concerns about the susceptibility of an international technology ecosystem. This is the same thing that raised concerns in the 1990s about a possible technological glitch that might cause widespread chaos come the new year.

An Australian cybersecurity analyst named Troy Hunt said on the social media site X that “this is essentially what we were all concerned about with Y2K, except it’s actually happened this time.”

Worldwide computer systems began to display the “blue screen of death” on Friday, signaling a problem with Microsoft’s Windows operating system.

Falco clarified, though, that the current circumstance is unique as “these companies are even more entrenched.” “We like to believe that we have a large pool of players at our disposal.”

Despite that, CrowdStrike’s biggest companies use the same technology.

Established in 2011, CrowdStrike claims to have “reinvented cybersecurity for the cloud era and transformed the way cybersecurity is delivered and experienced by customers” in its yearly report to financial authorities. It highlights the use of artificial intelligence in enabling it to maintain its competitiveness.

One of the most well-known cybersecurity companies in the world, with its headquarters located in Austin, Texas, makes large marketing investments, which include Super Bowl commercials.

At cybersecurity conferences, the business is well-known for its expansive booths whereby they showcase massive action-figure statues that symbolize different state-sponsored hacking groups. CrowdStrike technology is meant to take on these kinds of organizations.

George Kurtz, the CEO of CrowdStrike, is among the highest paid people in the world with nearly $230 million in remuneration over the last three years. In addition, Kurtz drives for a team of auto racers that CrowdStrike sponsors.

Kurtz issued an apology in a follow-up social media post on Friday and on NBC’s “Today Show” following criticism of his previous comments addressing the matter for lacking remorse.

“We are profoundly sorry for the inconvenience and disruption and comprehend the gravity of the situation,” he said on X. Richard Stiennon, a cybersecurity industry analyst,

Claims that CrowdStrike made a historic error.

According to Stiennon, who has spent 24 years keeping an eye on the cybersecurity industry, “this is unquestionably the most severe technical error, faux pas, or glitch of any security software provider in history.”

He said that even if there is a simple technical solution to the problem, there may be long-term effects for some companies. “It is exceedingly challenging to interact with millions of machines.” In a few weeks, the CEO will return from his trip to the Bahamas, and since many others are now on holiday, he won’t be able to access his computers.

Stiennon said the outage did not point to a larger problem with Crowdstrike or the cybersecurity sector.

“The markets will forgive them, the customers will forgive them, and this will be resolved,” he said.

SOURCE: USN

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Bob Newhart, Iconic Comedian and TV Star, Dies at 94

Too Soon For Comedy? After Attempted Assassination Of Trump, US Politics Feel Anything But Funny

California Representative Adam Schiff urges Biden to relinquish his position.

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Bob Newhart, Iconic Comedian and TV Star, Dies at 94

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Bob Newhart, Iconic Comedian and TV Star, Dies at 94

Bob Newhart, the deadpan accountant-turned-comedian who became one of the most popular TV personalities of his time after striking gold with a classic comedy album, died at 94.

Bob Newhart’s publicist, Jerry Digney, says the actor died Thursday in Los Angeles following a series of brief illnesses.

Bob Newhart, best known today as the star of two famous 1970s and 1980s television sitcoms bearing his name, began his career as a stand-up comedian in the late 1950s.

He rose to national prominence when his routine was recorded on vinyl in 1960 as “The Button-Down Mind of Bob Newhart,” which won the Grammy Award for album of the year.

While other comedians of the day, such as Lenny Bruce, Mort Sahl, Alan King, Mike Nichols, and Elaine May, regularly garnered laughs with their forceful attacks on current norms, Bob Newhart was an exception.

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His attitude was modern, but he rarely spoke above a timid, even stammering tone. His only prop was a telephone, which he used to pretend to converse with someone on the other end of the line.

In one memorable skit, he played a Madison Avenue image-maker who urged Abraham Lincoln to stop tampering with the Gettysburg Address and stick to the script written by his speechwriters.

“You changed four scores and seven to 87?” Newhart asks in disbelief. “Abe, that’s supposed to be a grabber…” It’s like Mark Antony saying, ‘Friends, Romans, countrymen, I’ve got something to tell you.'”

Another favorite was “Merchandising the Wright Brothers,” in which he attempted to persuade the aviation pioneers to launch an airline despite acknowledging that the distance of their first flight might limit them.

“Well, see, that’s going to hurt our time to the Coast if we’ve got to land every 105 feet.”

Bob Newhart initially hesitated to join a weekly television series, thinking it would overexpose his material. Nevertheless, he accepted an enticing offer from NBC, and “The Bob Newhart Show” debuted on October 11, 1961.

Despite receiving Emmy and Peabody awards, the half-hour variety program was canceled after one season, but it became a source of Newhart’s gags for decades afterward.

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He waited ten years before doing another “Bob Newhart Show” in 1972. This was a situation comedy starring Newhart as a Chicago psychotherapist who lives in a penthouse with his schoolteacher wife, Suzanne Pleshette.

Their neighbors and his patients, particularly Bill Daily, an airline navigator, were a crazy, neurotic group who provided an excellent backdrop to Newhart’s deadpan remarks.

The series, one of the most celebrated of the 1970s, ran until 1978.

Four years later, the comedian debuted another show, “Newhart.” This time, he was a successful New York writer who decided to reopen a Vermont inn that had been closed for many years. Again, Newhart stood out as the calm, rational man among strange locals. Again, the show was a big success, spanning eight seasons on CBS.

It ended unforgettably in 1990, with Newhart waking up in bed with Pleshette as his old Chicago psychologist character, wincing as he tells her about his bizarre dream: “I was an innkeeper in this insane tiny hamlet in Vermont. The handyman continued missing the point, and then there were three woodsmen, but only one spoke!”

The stunt was a parody of a “Dallas” episode in which a main character was killed off and then revived when it was discovered that the death was a dream.

Two subsequent series were comparative duds: “Bob,” 1992-93, and “George & Leo,” 1997-98. Despite multiple nominations, his only Emmy was for a cameo appearance on “The Big Bang Theory.” “I suppose they think I am not acting. That it’s simply Bob being Bob,” he moaned at not receiving television’s highest prize during his prime.

Newhart has also appeared in several films, most of which are comedies. Among them are “Catch 22,” “In and Out,” “Legally Blonde 2,” and “Elf,” as the small father of adoptive full-size son Will Ferrell. More recent work includes “Horrible Bosses,” the TV series “The Librarians,” and the “The Big Bang Theory” spin-off “Young Sheldon.”

After his fourth sitcom ended, Bob Newhart continued appearing on television occasionally and swore to work as long as possible in 2003.

“It’s been so much, 43 years of my life; (to quit) would be like something was missing,” remarked the actor.

Source: AP News

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